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Rules of Submission

We encourage the submission of original poetry in English on any theme.

•  No more than four original poems and / or translations.
•  There is no restriction on length.
•  We prefer submissions by email as a Word Document or in the body of the email.
•  Alternatively, our postal address is:

Oxford Poetry
Magdalen College
Oxford, OX1 4AU

•  Typescripts cannot be returned.

We will respond to submissions as soon as possible after the deadline,
31 May 2015.

Poetry Press from The Page

"The Paris Review published a poem by white poet Frederick Seidel, "The Ballad of Ferguson, Missouri," which was roundly panned as maudlin embarrassment. Goldsmith ended on the crotch but Seidel begins there: "A man unzipping his fly is vulnerable to attack." He identifies the black penis as a threat and a liability. It gets worse." Brian Droitcour • Art in America

"This kind of poet is the kind that has ‘something to say’ rather than a way of saying things. ‘Something to say’, unless it is really a method or a style, is likely to be prosaic at bottom, and turning it into poetry can often make it aesthetically worse—and less poetic—than it would have been if written in decent prose." Alex Wong • The Fortnightly Review

"In ‘1916 Not To Be Commemorated’, he sees the poets silenced by the outlawing of expression in any form other than “celebrity cliché, media jargon, smart-speak. I was just thinking, the other day, what could we do on this Easter Monday, 2016, and I’m trying to be somehow reasonable and I wouldn’t like to get into a public polemic about it. But I was thinking, maybe just five minutes’ silence, where everything stops, apart from utterly essential services. Just complete silence." Paul Durcan • Irish Examiner

"Oddly enough, although Bishop has attracted passionate readers, she has not always had accurate critics. David Kalstone’s early studies, Becoming a Poet and Five Temperaments, remain important. And there have been other careful readers. There is, for instance, a fine oral history. But too often the critique has seemed to portray her as a miniaturist, an artist on ivory. Too often the great poet of Geography III has been diminished by the conversation. Sometimes it has seemed that a radical poet would have to wait for a radical critic." Eavan Boland • Irish Times


Oxford Poetry is published twice a year, and currently edited by Lavinia Singer.

© Oxford Poetry 2013