“One of the best small magazines in the country.”
Tom Paulin


Rules of Submission

We encourage the submission of original poetry in English on any theme.

•  No more than four original poems and / or translations.
•  There is no restriction on length.
•  We prefer submissions by email as a Word Document or in the body of the email.
•  Alternatively, our postal address is:

Oxford Poetry
Magdalen College
Oxford, OX1 4AU

•  Typescripts cannot be returned.

Poetry Press from The Page

"The shadow of ballad or hymn meter haunts Riley’s fragmented parts, as does the spirit of song itself, which for all its elegiac purposes can never not be a sign of vitality. In an interview with the Web publication The Shearsman Review, Riley remarked of her career: “The only constant is a commitment to the thing that is song. This is in some way linked to the persistence of hope. Then as I get older this whole business of ‘song’ only becomes still more mysterious. It is a plain bright mystery.” Song is in dialogue with the “say” of Say Something Back, enacted between loftier rhyming stanzas and colloquial blank verse. Rhymes and rhythms assert themselves, then falter. It’s stop and go, this resumption of life after death." Ange Mlinko The Nation

"“His gift or genius is in his connection to the music of the spheres,” [Bob] Dylan went on. “In the song ‘Sisters of Mercy,’ for instance, the verses are four elemental lines which change and move at predictable intervals . . . but the tune is anything but predictable. The song just comes in and states a fact. And after that anything can happen and it does, and Leonard allows it to happen." David Remnick New Yorker

"Like NourbeSe Philip’s overlapping global perspectives, her book as a whole has the structure of a Venn diagram. Insofar as the title is an eponym of the last poem in the book, both title and poem frame the collection, giving it a circular shape from beginning to end." Tyrone Williams • Chicago Review

"So we have in this small book a complete picture of a human condition brought about by (but perhaps not unique to) a form of bereavement, elegantly and appealingly written, leaving us in no doubt as to its reality and terms of manifestation — you’d think that were enough. But it isn’t, because there is also the poetry, ‘A Part Song’." Peter Riley • Fortnightly Review of Books

Oxford Poetry is published twice a year, and currently edited by Mika Ross-Southall, Lavinia Singer and Andrew Wynn-Owen.

© Oxford Poetry 2013