“One of the best small magazines in the country.”
Tom Paulin

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Rules of Submission

We encourage the submission of original poetry in English on any theme.

•  No more than four original poems and / or translations.
•  There is no restriction on length.
•  We prefer submissions by email as a Word Document or in the body of the email.
•  Alternatively, our postal address is:

Oxford Poetry
Magdalen College
Oxford, OX1 4AU

•  Typescripts cannot be returned.

Oxford Poetry is currently closed to submissions. Please consult this webpage later in the autumn when a new submission deadline will be provided.

Poetry Press from The Page

"Poetry is like an old clock that stops ticking from time to time and needs to be violently shaken to get it running again, and if that doesn’t do the trick, opened up and disassembled, its wheels cleaned, lubricated, and its intricate moving parts made to run again. Unlike watchmakers, poets repair their poems by leaving parts behind that after centuries of use have turned out to be unnecessary to their workings. Hard as it is to believe, lyric poets are still tinkering with a contraption thousands of years old, mending it and reinventing it with no desire to call it quits. As they do that, poetry keeps changing while remaining the same." Charles Simic on Jana Prikryl NYRB

"In Stephen Dunn’s introduction to the volume, he writes that Cummings was “the Holden Caulfield of American poetry.” That’s partly right. Cummings’s two great interests were sex and sex—at least in the first part of his life." Micah Mattix • The Washington Free Beacon

"And if she got to know that he was giving a lecture somewhere in London she would stand outside the hall holding a placard that read, as I’ve always (and wrongly) remembered it: ‘This is the wife he abandoned.’ Sadly, but no doubt accurately, the various biographies substitute ‘I am’ for ‘This is’." Mary-Kay Wilmers LRB

"This phrase is but one example of her highly individual wrapping up of her poems in a final terse or laconic and intriguing statement of actual fact, which at the same time is almost more aware than the reader or writer can afford to deal with. It is a form of sabotage or inversion—I am telling you something but not quite the truth as it was. As ever with Ní Chuilleanáin’s vast intellectual compass, she makes valid connections between various different registers of language, her task being to hunt down somehow the meaning of a forgotten word that is well-nigh irrecoverable." Medbh McGuckian Breac


Oxford Poetry is published twice a year, and currently edited by Mika Ross-Southall, Lavinia Singer and Andrew Wynn-Owen.

© Oxford Poetry 2013