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Submissions Closed

Thank you to everyone who sent in poems for our Summer 2017 issue.

The submission window has now closed and the Editors are reading the exciting new work sent in on the theme of 'slant'. If you submitted work you can expect a response at the end of June.

Rules of Submission

We encourage the submission of original poetry in English on any theme. Only poems sent in during our dedicated biannual submission windows (announced on this page) will be read by the Editors.

•  No more than four original poems and / or translations.
•  There is no restriction on length.
•  Poems must not be previously published. We welcome simultaneous submissions, but please inform us if your work is accepted elsewhere.
•  We accept submissions by email. Please save your poem in a Word document with filename: YourName_Title.doc; if submitting more than one poem, please save the group within a single Word document with filename: YourName_Multiple.doc

Poetry Press from The Page

"There’s a clever-cleverness in contemporary American poetry that keeps alive older verse traditions, straddles generations, and seems very much a boy thing—Frederick Seidel, Paul Muldoon, Michael Robbins, and Adam Fitzgerald come quickly to mind." Joshua Weiner • The Chicago Review

"Every day, it seems, I learn again how little power I have, and how much. In the process of bringing this forum into being, I have been confronted, again, with my complicity in structures of power, and I remain enraged by the way ignorance (my own and others’) greases the wheels of those structures. Knowledge is power, and ignorance is a privilege you pay for in units of power." Evie Shockley Evening Will Come

"When the novelist E. M. Forster wrote to Housman expressing enthusiasm for his poetry, Housman responded with a letter that Forster described as “absolutely hateful … I was so disappointed and hurt that I destroyed it after one rapid perusal."." Adam Kirsch • The Atlantic

"Emily Dickinson, for example, masterfully simplified complex topics with poems like “Because I could not stop for Death,” and many poets are similarly adept. Business leaders live in multifaceted, dynamic environments. Their challenge is to take that chaos and make it meaningful and understandable. Reading and writing poetry can exercise that capacity, improving one’s ability to better conceptualize the world and communicate it — through presentations or writing — to others." John Coleman Harvard Business Review


Oxford Poetry is published twice a year, and currently edited by Nancy Campbell, Mary Jean Chan and Theophilus Kwek.

© Oxford Poetry 2017