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Submissions Open

Our submissions have opened for the Winter 2017-2018 issue, on the theme of 'crossings'. Read more about this call on our home page!

Rules of Submission

We encourage the submission of original poetry in English on any theme. Only poems sent in during our dedicated biannual submission windows (announced on this page) will be read by the Editors.

•  No more than four original poems and / or translations.
•  There is no restriction on length.
•  Poems must not be previously published. We welcome simultaneous submissions, but please inform us if your work is accepted elsewhere.
•  We accept submissions by email. Please save your poem in a Word document with filename: YourName_Title.doc; if submitting more than one poem, please save the group within a single Word document with filename: YourName_Multiple.doc

Poetry Press from The Page

"It is wonderful for criticism to be generous to its readers, but is it best for lyric poetry?”" Alibhe Darcy • B O D Y

"Szymborska, on the other hand, loathed the attention thrust upon her. She didn’t like talking about herself or her work, and moreover, as Janusz R. Kowalczyk puts it, “Szymborska did not enjoy ostentation or celebrations—being declared the Nobel laureate was considered ‘the Stockholm tragedy’ by her friends, as it forced her to give more interviews in a month than she had faced in her life.”" Jonathan Russell Clark • Lit Hub

"It is also Aeschylus that forms the link to Balmer’s second book, The Paths of Survival, a larger, less personal enterprise – “larger” in that it covers more than 2,000 years in the history of Aeschylus’s lost play, Myrmidons. Very little of Aeschylus survives at all and only tiny fragments of Myrmidons remain as preserved, quoted or referred to over time. In this sense it represents all lost texts, all destructions by fire, fury, theft, or neglect." George Szirtes • New Statesman

"Plath’s early poetry, the stuff she wrote at Smith and had published in Harper’s, was awful. Written under the burdensome influence of Dylan Thomas, it was, as Thomas could occasionally be, showy and aimless. (“Go get the goodly squab in gold-lobed corn / And pluck the droll flecked quail where thick they lie.”)" Anwen Crawford • New Yorker


Oxford Poetry is published twice a year, and currently edited by Nancy Campbell, Mary Jean Chan and Theophilus Kwek.

© Oxford Poetry 2017