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Submissions Open

Our submissions have opened for the Winter 2017-2018 issue, on the theme of 'crossings'. Read more about this call on our home page!

Rules of Submission

We encourage the submission of original poetry in English on any theme. Only poems sent in during our dedicated biannual submission windows (announced on this page) will be read by the Editors.

•  No more than four original poems and / or translations.
•  There is no restriction on length.
•  Poems must not be previously published. We welcome simultaneous submissions, but please inform us if your work is accepted elsewhere.
•  We accept submissions by email. Please save your poem in a Word document with filename: YourName_Title.doc; if submitting more than one poem, please save the group within a single Word document with filename: YourName_Multiple.doc

Poetry Press from The Page

"But I was pleased to learn that John Ashbery really liked to tell jokes. One joke John told Ted unrolled in the following circumstance: Ted goes over to Frank O'Hara's to get some poems for "C". It is late Sunday morning. Frank hasn't come out of the bedroom yet, actually. Then John comes over too, and Frank still hasn't come out (I don't know how they got into the apartment! the door had been left open?) They wait, they wait. Then, Jim Brodey comes out of Frank's bedroom, and leaves. Then Ted and John wait some more. Then John tells Ted the following joke. John: Have you heard about the Dumb Bunny Bomb? Ted: No, John. John: You drop it over a large city, and all its inhabitants instantly become stupid. (Pause) I think they dropped it this morning.” Alice Notley • Brooklyn Rail

"Just as I had begun to think Emre’s preferences for personal essays would be disastrous if applied to poetry—because I see poetry as, among other things, consciousness put down on the page—her parsing of Gaitskill’s “mechanicalness” and the importance of being vigilant of its myriad tentacles makes perfect sense when we remember that the worst poetry often mines clichés, the mechanical and rote accommodation of predictable ideation around (as above) dating, the social mediatization of one’s ideas or real-life experience, sexual mores, coolness, troubling political realities, etc.”Nyla Matuk • Berfrois

"Of [Jack] Gilbert's favored words, probably none conveys better the poet -- his life, his work, his ambitions for both -- than magnitude. ” John Penner • LA Times

"The first words spoken by a mortal in Virgil’s poem are Aeneas’ in terror of the storm and in dread of a watery grave.” A.E. Stallings • The Hudson Review


Oxford Poetry is published twice a year, and currently edited by Nancy Campbell, Mary Jean Chan and Theophilus Kwek.

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