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Submissions Closed

Thank you to everyone who sent in poems for our Summer 2017 issue.

The submission window has now closed and the Editors are reading the exciting new work sent in on the theme of 'slant'. If you submitted work you can expect a response at the end of June.

Rules of Submission

We encourage the submission of original poetry in English on any theme. Only poems sent in during our dedicated biannual submission windows (announced on this page) will be read by the Editors.

•  No more than four original poems and / or translations.
•  There is no restriction on length.
•  Poems must not be previously published. We welcome simultaneous submissions, but please inform us if your work is accepted elsewhere.
•  We accept submissions by email. Please save your poem in a Word document with filename: YourName_Title.doc; if submitting more than one poem, please save the group within a single Word document with filename: YourName_Multiple.doc

Poetry Press from The Page

"Churchyard was no less keen on the use of words as weapons. Woodcock finds that his “dominant character” is “Churchyard the complainant or petitioner”, adopted right from his first publication, Davy Dycars Dreame (1551). Emulating Langland and Skelton, he sets out the social and economic grievances of the common man (in this case a “dyker”, a ditcher or labourer) in a broadside poem which provoked a print controversy comprising sixteen further works by various authors." Helen Hackett TLS

"Well the sonnet is an obsessional form. Its intellectual skeleton is opposition, its form is imbalance, the impatient compression of its concluding section (whether six, four, three or two lines) always leaving a question only temporarily settled, so the writer is invited or compelled to return to the charge, as in a domestic argument: “ … And another thing”. Eilean Ni Chuilleanain DRB

"The curse poem is a well-known Irish literary genre, especially in the Gaelic tradition Hartnett inherited through his Kerry-born grandmother, one of the last native Irish speakers in west Limerick." Frank McNally Irish Times

"After the discovery of a cache of Boswell manuscripts in 1929, Woolf’s diary records her feelings about the find: “Think! There are 18 volumes of Boswell’s diaries now to be published. With any luck I shall live to read them. I feel as if some dead person were said to be living after all”." Rachel Bowlby TLS


Oxford Poetry is published twice a year, and currently edited by Nancy Campbell, Mary Jean Chan and Theophilus Kwek.

© Oxford Poetry 2017