“One of the best small magazines in the country.”
Tom Paulin

Latest News

XV.iii / Summer 2015

The latest edition of Oxford Poetry has finally arrived in all its colourful vibrancy and is available to order from our Shop page, where you can also see the list of contributors. Inside, you'll find poems characterised by counterintuitive compounds, ‘nightlife’ and ‘daydeath’. What are the implications of laying aside a day for the dead? How does a city come to life after dark? And then how lively the “race to the death” in a new poem by Simon Armitage – to whom we extend hearty welcome in his new role as the Oxford Professor of Poetry. To top it all off, we have Hayden Kay's artwork – grinning skulls both mask-like and exposing what lies beneath the mask.

We hope you enjoy it.

New Editorship Announcement

Oxford Poetry is delighted to welcome two new editors who are joining Lavinia Singer at the helm: Mika Ross-Southall and Andrew Wynn-Owen. Our first issue together will be the forthcoming Summer issue, submissions for which we are trawling through currently. Thank you, poets, for your patience.

We would like to give our greatest thanks and appreciation to the immense work of former editor Aime Williams who is off to explore new literary 'litora'. The magazine's new design, database, printers and website – not to mention the four issues since 2012 including OP's special centenary celebration – could not have been done without her. She will be missed.

And so, to new horizons!

XV.ii / Winter 2014-15

The latest Oxford Poetry has arrived in all its chilling glory and is available to order on our Shop page, where you can also find a list of all contributors.

At this moment we are NOT open to submissions – the deadline was 31st May. We are unable to consider work received after this date. A new deadline will be uploaded onto our Submissions page in due course.

XV.i / Summer 2014

Autumn's russets and raindrops may be upon us, but enjoy a last ray of summer with the latest Oxford Poetry. Currently at the printers, it should be with all our subscribers by the end of the month. Preorder and peruse its contents page at our Shop here!

Open for Submissions

Now that our summer issue is well on the way, we are open to receiving submissions once more. Please read our guidelines before sending, which can be found in the Submit section of our website.

And please note that there may be quite a wait until we respond. We'll do our best !

Oxford Poetry Summer Issue

We are currently putting together our summer issue, and are in the process of replying to all our submissions. Thank you for your patience!

At this time, we are not open for submissions. Please check the Submit section of our website, which we will update with the new deadline before long.

In the meantime, Oxford Poetry: 100 years is out and available to buy here. With archive material from former editors, as well as new poems and contributors, it is a truly special historical momento.

Thank you to all of our supporters. We look forward to sharing a new issue with you soon!

100 years of Oxford Poetry

The next issue of Oxford Poetry will be a special centenary edition, celebrating the rich history of the magazine and its extraordinary array of writers since first being published by Sir Basil Blackwell as Oxford Poetry: 1910–1913.

We will be launching the edition with drinks and readings right back where it all started: at Blackwell's Bookshop in Oxford, on Tuesday 28th January.

Buy tickets here

See you there!

XIV.3: Editorial

This edition of Oxford Poetry comes to you with a beautiful map, although I’m not sure it would get you anywhere. This map is an accident; resisting editorial tyranny, we didn’t set a theme for this issue. But our reviews have sailed back to us with thoughts of travel and distant lands. Laura Marsh, writing from New York, reminds us of Charles Simic’s ‘shifting, émigré life’ in post-war Europe. His New & Selected is shaped by a travel at the mercy of paperwork and postage-stamps. ‘Poetry-cartographer’ John Gallas explores European poetries in his new Carcanet collection – reviewed here by Evan Jones. Crossing the Atlantic, Alex Niven sketches the ‘coordinates’ plotted between late-modernist verse and the contemporary avant-garde of Flood Editions. Hugh Foley, meanwhile, dislikes both posturing and psychogeography, preferring ‘imperial misadventure’ instead. Colette Sensier retreats to fairytale worlds, and, totally unrelatedly, Adam Crothers thinks about C.K. Williams’s failure to die.

If maps are a thing of certainty and direction, it seems understandable that when either are lacking we return to maps for routes through. There are obvious points to be made about the various crises we share as a globe. And the tenuousness of our theme perhaps matches the growing sense of maps not as navigation, but as exploration. Certainty seems ever more irrelevant.

Aime Williams

‘Map me no Maps, Sir, my Head is a Map’ – Politick, from Fielding’s Rape upon Rape.

MAP: The word covers much more than the little ‘table napkin’ from which it originated: heads, poems, websites…all spaces for concentrating and celebrating the data of lived experience.

And a magazine is no exception: forgive us, Politick, but Oxford Poetry is a colourful sail of a map, charting dazzling lands. Some poems are rooted to this earth – Wendy Klein’s peas and the rare plants of Annie Freud. Others blasting beyond – Adam O. Davis’s ‘Astronauts’ and Mark Ford’s 'shifting / architecture of the clouds'. We encounter the 'strange knowledge' of human love, depicted by Niall Campbell and Jack Underwood, and the exotic trails laid by foreign words, thanks to Roddy Lumsden and Jamie McKendrick. Even further, as Aime has mentioned: the continent-skipping, generation-jumping range of our reviews.

Lastly, to remind us that cartography is as much a realm for visual aesthetics, we are delighted by Hannah Bagshaw's inventive map design, which makes this magazine a very pretty napkin indeed.

Enjoy the journey!

Lavinia Singer

OP & the Internet

Welcome to the new Oxford Poetry website, designed and built by Kathryn Lewis. We hope our century-old archives, featuring interviews and the odd article, will now be more accessible.

Issue XIV.3 is currently with the printers and will be on its way to subscribers soon! If you're not a subscriber or you'd like to buy single issues of the magazine, you can visit our new online shop.

XIV.2: Editorial

To 'edit' – e + dere – is to 'give out' or 'put forth', and so comes the editor's task of selecting poems to place in the spotlight. But where to start?

The magazine initially offered the poetry of young students "from one not very large University", as Gilbert Murray acknowledged in the Introduction. For our first issue as editors, we too have decided to 'strip back' to a selection of verse, narrowing focus on the poems themselves. Yet thankfully, OP now accepts work by poets of all ages and backgrounds. One of our contributors is an Oxford undergraduate, but we welcome many more: students from elsewhere, professors, editors, bloggers, international writers, the well-established and neophytes.

Murray admitted to holding "classic" preferences: "I do believe that a rose has as a rule more beauty than a c

Poetry Press from The Page

"As writers’ primary access to artworks throughout the twentieth century, museums and galleries, and their coffee table style publications, have operated as regulators for twentieth century ekphrasis – the verbal representation of visual representation – by limiting the available source materials and directing the ways in which they are processed. The result has been largely homogenising, with ekphrastic poetry dealing predominantly in the fine art of white, Western males, and exhibiting a poetic approach that mimics an art critical-historical one, asking readers to view the pieces in question as ‘timeless repositories of human wisdom’." Sophie Collins • Prac Crit

"Voyage demonstrates the elements that formulate an identity, inform a life. There is the personal—the “I” as an agent, a witness, a mind and body present. There is also the historical—all the shit that precedes one’s birth that has an impact, now, even when it traces back to antiquity. [Robin Coste] Lewis asks, “What can History possibly say?” Everything and nothing, it seems." Diana Arterian • The Rumpus

"Bringing this new selection of Tanikawa’s vast output together from his sixty plus published collections was surely no easy ask, but the representative offering presented here offers a compact, easily navigable, albeit at times unbalanced resource to those readers already familiar with the poet and perhaps looking for an abbreviated hit. It also provides a sprawling, exciting gateway for those brand new and looking to get into Tanikawa’s poetry." Simon Haworth • Manchester Review

"Few books evoke place as much as this one evokes the entirety of the natural world." John Findura • Tarpaulin Sky

Oxford Poetry is published twice a year, and currently edited by Mika Ross-Southall, Lavinia Singer and Andrew Wynn-Owen.

© Oxford Poetry 2013